How to Make Your Mix Sound Bigger

EQ Lows and HighsWhen mixing your song, you’ll sometimes want to expand the depth and feel of a track or the overall mix. There are certainly ways to do this and so we thought we’d share some common tips and tricks for making your mix sound bigger.

 

EQ Up Lows and Highs

Pull up an equalizer and boost the low end ever so slightly to add a bit of richness to the bass. Likewise, boosting the highs a touch can add more brightness and details. This works on individual tracks or a master track.

 

Layer Up

Adding more layers is one of the easiest ways to bring more texture and depth to your mix. If you work in a lot of samples, you can often copy and paste the MIDI data into a new patch. You can use different layers to bring out different aspects of the sound you’re looking for.

 

Like the rich lows on one piano, but prefer the crisp highs on another? Layer them on top of each other and let the best of each shine through. It’s also a great way to make your music sound unique.

 

Add Some Reverb

The right amount of reverb can add space and depth to your mix, especially in the low range. Experiment with different settings to find the sweet spot between depth and an “overproduced” sound.

 

808 Kick Drum

The legendary Roland 808 drum machine has been lauded for its deep kick drum pretty much since it was released in the 80’s. You can download samples of the 808 for free. Try adding an 808 kick layer to your drum track to see if it makes your kick fill out better. We bet it probably will.

 

Widen Your Stereo Image

Sometimes simply making your panning a little more exaggerated can make your stereo image feel a whole lot wider, causing a bigger perceived space for the listener.

 

Using these techniques when mixing can add a great deal of added fullness to your mix, which will translate well after the mastering process. The trick is to use them in moderation and to know when it’s best to use each one. Sometimes, less is more.