Creative Rights Caucus Formed by U.S. House Representatives

We write a lot about the rights of independent artists, particularly as those rights seem to be nearly constantly in flux as laws are written and rewritten defining what copyright protection means in the digital age. Government Building

So we like to take note whenever anything new is added to the books. Congresswoman Judy Chu and Congressman Howard Coble launched the Creative Right Caucus that will serve to raise awareness of artist rights to both Congress and the American public. The program is aimed at all artists, not just musicians, but it specifically highlights music industry rights to Congress.

“American innovation hinges on creativity — it is what allows our kids to dream big and our artists to create works that inspire us all,” said Representative Chu in a statement announcing the caucus. “The jobs that result are thanks entirely to our willingness to foster creative talent, and an environment where it can thrive and prosper.

Coble, who also is the Chair of the House Subcommittee on Courts, Intellectual Property and the Internet, also spoke about the new organization.

“The economic contributions made by the creative community keep our nation competitive in a global economy,” he said. “These works are among our most precious exports because the ingenuity, skill, and craftsmanship of American creators cannot be duplicated anywhere else in the world.”

Chu and 10 other representatives met with music artists and managers before the launch of the caucus to discuss the goals of copyright protection. Daryl P. Friedman, chief advocacy and industry relations officer for the Recording Academy told Billboard the caucus can provide helpful influence in Washington.

“Along with the Recording Arts and Sciences Caucus and the Songwriters Caucus, it demonstrates Congress is serious about finding ways to protect creators in a bipartisan way,” he said. “A number of key Hill leaders are taking an interest in creators’ rights and we hope they will help influence new members about the importance of protecting copyright.”

The Songwriters Caucus was formed in 2003 by Senate representatives in association with the Nashville Songwriters Association International. The Recording Arts and Sciences Congressional Caucus (RASCC) was formed the following year. The Recording Academy, formerly known as the National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences, is best known for issuing the Grammy Awards and helped organize the RASCC.